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INTERVIEW WITH Sorin Bechira

9: Order vs Chaos

January 24th, 2009

As we rang in the new year with Order vs. Chaos, we sat down with featured artist Bechira Sorin to discuss life, love and art.


Saad Moosajee:
Bechira, first off congratulations on your feature for our 9th release, "Order vs Chaos"! Why don't you introduce yourself and tell us a bit about yourself

Sorin Bechira:
Thank you! It's a honour for me to be the featured artist @s3.

I am a graphic/multimedia designer with more than 8 years of experience. I graduated the Fine Arts Faculty from Timisoara and currently I'm working as art director at X3 Studios. I always try to experiment and work on every field of visual communications: digital matte painting, vfx, graphic design, illustration, typography, combining traditional techniques with digital ones.

This is my short bio.

Saad Moosajee:
You seem to be working in a multitude of disciplines, in Order vs. Chaos we saw some fantastic matte paintings from you but in previous packs we've seen typography and illustration, If you had to pick one discipline, which would you pick? why did you choose to mainly do matte paintings for order vs. chaos

Sorin Bechira:
If I had to pick one I couldn't decide. I like to use and know many techniques in order to enlarge my visual language. I like to do illustrations and play with experimental typography, but mostly I like to make digital matte paintings. Unfortunately, I don't have much time for matte paintings since my everyday work is web oriented. I wish to someday work in the film field along with the best artists around. As for this pack release I chose to do them because I felt inspired and challenged by the theme.

Saad Moosajee:
This pack was a twist on what we usually do, did this impede you or only motivate you to work harder?

Sorin Bechira:
It motivated me. I love new challenges. They keep my mind fresh, at least this is what I like to think. . The theme is gorgeous. It can be interpreted in so many different ways and s3 artists really did it great.

Saad Moosajee:
We see that you work primarily in digital mediums, have you ever done anything traditionally? What is your opinion on traditional art and do you think it plays an important role in a digital artists skill set?

Sorin Bechira:
I started with traditional mediums - they're like my first love . I started like everyone with drawing, and later I discovered etching. From there I discovered mono prints, dry points, then to other acid techniques. So far it's been the best artistic period in my life so far. I've learned so much and it helped me develop and gain knowledge for digital techniques. Unfortunately, lately I don't have time to do etching.

Saad Moosajee:
That's usually the case. Etching is a beautiful art. Did you ever find yourself imitating any great artists from the past such as Dali or Magritte? And if so, who is your all time favorite traditional artist?

Sorin Bechira:
I didn't wanted to imitate anyone from the great artists because I don't feel like I deserve it. But to be honest, I did a lame copy of Picasso's' "Moiselles D'Avignon" . But I don't want to show it to anyone My principle is that I need to develop my own techniques.

Saad Moosajee:
And your all time favorite traditional artist is?

Sorin Bechira:
Hard to say, I think it's probably Zdzislaw Beksinski (http://www.beksinski.pl/).

Saad Moosajee:
Experimentation is always good

Salvador Dali once said, "have no fear of perfection, you will never reach it" what do you think of this quote? Do you strive for perfection or endorse human errors?

Sorin Bechira:
Haha, he was mad but so correct. I dream for perfection, but I have such a long way to go that I don't want to think about it. Many times I get something nice and spontaneous from mistakes, so I like human errors after all.

Saad Moosajee:
Dali was indeed insane, but in his paintings he always had hidden symbols and depictions of the outside world, events that were going on and such. Do you ever portray world changing issues in your art like global warming, poverty, etc.?

Sorin Bechira:
I think that's the reason he became insane. Since he was a surrealist painter he usually transmitted a double message to the viewer visually. I don't have those kind of messages but I try to transmit a message in almost every work I do mainly because of my graphic design background. I need to send a message to the viewer, it's my way of thinking. But not global warming, that's such a cliche, not that it's not important but I try to get away from those types of messages.

Saad Moosajee:
Can you give our readers a typical breakdown of a matte painting you do, from the drawing board the finished composition?

Sorin Bechira:
It's the same thinking process that I use on every work of mine. First I imagine what I want to do and draw a quick sketch to block in the proportions and the dynamics of the piece. But if something better comes into my mind in the meantime I do it as I don't like to stick with one idea in mind from start to finish. It can be boring sometimes and I like to have some fun too After I'm satisfied with the sketch, I look for photo references, or build some simple 3d geometric shapes and apply photos to them. Then I paint over with some custom brushes and use the clone tool. That's it, nothing fancy.

It's not the technique that matters, it's the result. That's my first rule and I stick by it

Saad Moosajee:
You've created a fine portfolio, but if you had to choose one individual work as your favorite, which would it be and why?

Sorin Bechira:
I can't choose one; they're like my babies. But I get bored so quickly that I don't like any of them after a while.... I mean 2 weeks

Saad Moosajee:
As said this exhibition was a dual meaning, which word did you prefer to work with more, Order or Chaos, or did you enjoy mixing them the best?

Sorin Bechira:
I chose chaos of course. I'm afraid of order but I sometimes try to do order from chaos - in my thoughts. And sometimes I must make some chaos in order to break the monotony, so I choose them both.

Saad Moosajee:
What would you say your favorite piece from the pack is?

Sorin Bechira:
I think it's "l'escalier d'art" by insane'k, it's very dynamic, minimalist, cold and yet so misterious.

Saad Moosajee:
How do you feel about critique, do you think this is a positive attribute of art collectives like slashTHREE or something negative?

Sorin Bechira:
I think it's something essential as long as it's given by responsible and mature artists. It can be interpreted in a constructive manner by the artist who receives it in order to keep his idea and personality. So, yes it's something essential for the growth of a solid and good community

Saad Moosajee:
Working as an art director is a prestigious but time consuming job, do you feel that work takes away from your design to produce art or only fuels it?

Sorin Bechira:
This job, like all, has its ups and downs. It's very time consuming and sometimes overwhelming but the design required is less. It's a creative process that gives you wings and that's the beauty of it. You get a lot of strong ideas and give them to your brilliant art department to give them life. When you have a brilliant art department as I am honored to you are the happiest man. This is the secret

Saad Moosajee:
Even though you are still experimenting, your still producing some phenomenal work, what tips would you give to any other artists out there who are still learning?

Sorin Bechira:
Wait, I'm sill learning too . I have a phrase that I like; "Never stop experimenting. Be a perfectionist, be restless, but always be a dreamer." And now to more practical advice. Learn art history. Knowing the past is making the future.

Saad Moosajee:
Before we finish up this interview would you like to shout out to anyone?

Sorin Bechira:
I would like to thank all of you for this great art community where we all can explore and learn. Thank you!

Saad Moosajee:
Thank you very much for participating in this interview and congratulations once more from the slashTHREE staff on your feature!